Emoticons :) or Emoticons :( ?

Emoticons :) or Emoticons :( ? {0}

“Although an emoticon may look like a smile, a frown or any number of facial expressions, it doesn’t represent a face, as many internet users assume. It’s actually intended to convey a feeling (“I’m happy,” or “just joking”).” This article from Quartz describes how emoticons and “text speak” are able to convey a lot more than words alone.  

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Origins of the Vietnamese Writing System: Quốc Ngữ

Origins of the Vietnamese Writing System: Quốc Ngữ {0}

Recently I attended a fantastic lecture by Professor Christopher Lovins as part of the Oberlin Korean Student Association (OKSA) Biennial Conference, and while not the main takeaway by any means, I learned a little bit of something about the origins of hangul, the modern day Korean writing system. I should probably actually provide some more(…)

Current Form of Human Language May Have Risen Quicker Than You Think

Current Form of Human Language May Have Risen Quicker Than You Think {0}

It seems to be common knowledge that human language evolved gradually from caveman grunts or the mumbles and gesticulations of early hunter-gatherers, but a recent paper published on the rise of human language suggests that it may have risen much more quickly and systematically than that.

Can you invent an accent?

Can you invent an accent? {0}

“Last year a Canadian public radio show called “This is That” reported a somewhat ridiculous-seeming plan, cooked up in the northern Alberta town of High Prairie: to attract more tourists, the town council had hired a linguist from Texas to invent a local accent. Shopkeepers and residents would learn to speak in ascending tones, and drop their r’s,(…)

How did European languages evolve?

How did European languages evolve? {0}

“The origin of Indo-European languages has long been a topic of debate among scholars and scientists. In 2012, a team of evolutionary biologists at the University of Auckland led by Dr. Quentin Atkinson released a study that found all modern IE languages could be traced back to a single root: Anatolian — the language of Anatolia, now modern-day(…)

Palenquero: Spanish influences, African roots

Palenquero: Spanish influences, African roots {0}

In a small impoverished village in Colombia called San Basilio de Palenque, a population of 3,500 is working hard to keep their unique language alive. One of the many languages in world spoken only in its immediate region, Palenquero fights to remain on the linguist’s radar.