Are you a beginner in a new language? Rest assured that there’s one word that anyone can understand

Are you a beginner in a new language? Rest assured that there’s one word that anyone can understand {0}

According to a recent Dutch psycholinguistics study, there’s one word that can be understood in 31 languages. Huh?? Click here to read an article from Business Insider about this really useful word. image credit: news.com.au

What’s so great about bilingualism?

What’s so great about bilingualism? {0}

There has been a lot of good press about bilingualism these days, both from popular science and from some studies that have shown that being bilingual can delay dementia and improve memory function over the course of your life. This article from the New Yorker gives a balanced and well-researched discussion of what bilingualism’s benefits really are,(…)

Gestures and pictures improve language learning {0}

As someone who teaches SITES and spent a semester doing original research into the impact of gestures on language learning, I’m really into this kind of contextualized language teaching. Read more about how movement and visuals can help you learn (or teach!) a language: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/289162.php

Chimpanzees Learn New Language

Chimpanzees Learn New Language {0}

A study was recently conducted on chimpanzee behavior to determine whether or not they can pick up a new language when they move location.

Learning Languages Together: Lang-8

Learning Languages Together: Lang-8 {0}

There are a number of language learning tools out there, and especially when it comes to self-study, it really helps to find the resources that are fun for you. Something that I finally got around to trying is a website called Lang-8. It is essentially a website for blogging / journaling in a language that(…)

Languages and Genes Evolve Together

Languages and Genes Evolve Together {0}

“As human populations disperse, the separation leads to changes both in genes and in language. So if we look at human DNA and languages over time, we should find that they differ along similar geographic lines.” Click here to read more.