Shea Pierre

An Oberlin course blog

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Grieg, Lyric Pieces and Songs

May 13th, 2011 by Shea Pierre · Uncategorized

Although I didn’t thoroughly enjoy all of the lyric pieces, I admire the sense of nationalism Grieg presents to the listener.  Also, his use of folk music is really obvious.  The pieces are charming and melodic and makes for very pleasent background music.

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Mussorgsky, Pictures at an Exhibition

May 13th, 2011 by Shea Pierre · Uncategorized

It is difficult to put into words how much I enjoy this music.  It’s amazing to know that this was a solo piano piece.  Mussorgsky wrote Pictures at an Exhibition after seeing an exhibition of paintings by a friend who had just died. He went home and wrote Pictures on the piano. “The Promenade,” which describes walking between the pictures.  This concept is very interesting and definitely drew my attention towards the Russian school of thought.

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Strauss, Rosenkavalier (Act I)

May 13th, 2011 by Shea Pierre · Uncategorized

This lively act is backed by an orchestra that has carefully laid out textures.  The harmonically sophisticated structures compliments Octavian’s secret love affiar.  I’ve always enjoyed Strauss’s waltzes during Music History 101.  This opera encourages me to go beyond that.

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Wagner, Parsifal (Act III)

May 13th, 2011 by Shea Pierre · Uncategorized

This opera definitely exemplifies “music drama.”  It can be seen as an expression of the Christian faith and relates to Wagner’s anti-Semitic and the need for the Aryan race to be regenerated through the blood of Christ.  This is probably one of Wagner’s more problematic works.  Wagner uses the orchestra to create thick leit motifs and makes sure that they are very detailed.

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Verdi, Don Carlos (Act IV)

May 13th, 2011 by Shea Pierre · Uncategorized

The orchestral parts in Don Carlos is not heavy in this Verdi opera, but always sets the mood of the themes. Verdi does a great job of  utilizing the orchestra to the maximum and supports the vocals without overpowering them. . Unlike his predecessors  in Italian opera, iVerdi gave the orchestras more responsibility in the entirety of the opera.

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Rossini, La Cenerentola (Act I)

May 13th, 2011 by Shea Pierre · Uncategorized

I enjoyed this intimate comical aspect, as it relates to the play and the audience, of this opera.  There is definitely a connection to the audience through because it is subtle, humorous richly sung.  Rossini did a great job on taking on the classic story of Cinderella..

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Beethoven, Missa Solemnis in D Major, Op. 123 (Kyrie, Gloria, Credo)

May 13th, 2011 by Shea Pierre · Uncategorized

There is a highly personal character to Beethoven’s religious expression, Missa Solemnis.  Missa Solemnis uses a wide disparity of style and tone in its movements. Its use of modalities and musical forms, and its contrasts of lyricism and fury, might be explained by remembering the personal character of the work and its place in Beethoven’s own religious views.   The Missa Solemnis is in five movements. It begins with an orchestral introduction to the opening solem Kyrie. The middle movements, the Gloria and the Credo, are passionate and fiery opening sections and lengthy fugues for their conclusions. The fourth movement, a Sanctus, has lovely passages for solo violin which accompany in turn the soloists and the chorus. The final movement, Agnus Dei, involves a musical contrast between a march theme in the orchestra.  Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed this piece and it’s dynamic contrast

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Clara Schumann Three Romances

March 21st, 2011 by Shea Pierre · Uncategorized

To begin with, I feel as if this piece reflects a  high level of compositional diversity.  The texture of this work is heavily influenced by Robert Schumann’s compositional style and it is very similar in tone.  However, there isn’t the same depth to Clara’s music as there is to Robert’s.  All three instruments are constantly playing, creating a rich sonority.  Emotion and intensity are very well key elements in the structure of this piece.  This trio has proven itself to be one of my favorite of the 19th century.

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Piano Quintet in A Major Trout.

February 28th, 2011 by Shea Pierre · Uncategorized

I’d like to start this blog by saying Schubert’s melodies contain a lot of “sing-like” components. The phrasings are very lyrical. Schubert tends to stay straight and narrow harmonically. However, in the development he makes a quick jump to another key. I feel as if the development was the most unstable harmonic proportion of the piece. This piece represents the fact that Schubert know how to pour out emotion.

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Hello world!

February 22nd, 2011 by Shea Pierre · Uncategorized

Welcome to your blog. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!

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