Cinema Studies 299

An Oberlin course blog

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Parody

April 11, 2011 by Marcus Johnson on Marcus Johnson's Blog · Uncategorized

I think that parody can be one of the most effective cinematic tactics. To take the serious and fundamental and transform it into something laughable. Here is a mashup of the classic film “Friday”, with Rebecca Black’s most hated song in America, by the same name.

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R for Real

April 9, 2011 by Daniel Siegelman on Daniel Siegelman's Blog · Uncategorized

In Medium Cool, “real” and the “fictional” are tightly interwoven, continuously accenting and reflecting on one another. However, the relationship between the two realms changes throughout the film. At the beginning, most of what we see – footage of protests, interviews and the like – is real. Only brief glimpses… read more

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medium cool

April 8, 2011 by Michael Stanton on Michael Stanton's Blog · Uncategorized

I think what made this move so effective and easy to connect with, had to do with the influence of the documentary style. But this was more than just the camerawork and the partially improvised dialogue. It also I think had to do with how the narrative presented the characters.… read more

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Rubber

April 7, 2011 by Stefan Berg on Stefan Berg's Blog · Uncategorized

Over the past month I have been hearing a lot about the film “Rubber” directed by Quentin Dupieux. Although it was first shown at Cannes Film Festival in May 2010, the film will not officially released on DVD in the US until June 7 of this year. The… read more

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Spike Lee Films

April 6, 2011 by Marcus Johnson on Marcus Johnson's Blog · Uncategorized

I’ve always been a fan of Spike Lee films. His stories are always full of perception and insight, showing us the many different sides of America. One of my favorite Spike Lee films is He Got Game. This film stars Ray Allen, an NBA player who has surprisingly impressive acting… read more

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35 Up: What Happens When They Start Dying?

March 25, 2011 by Samantha Sterman on Samantha Sterman's Blog · Uncategorized

I think the ultimate fault of what we saw of the series called 35 Up is the interview style led by Michael Apted. He made a mistake by pushing his interviewees. The most fascinating part of the series was seeing footage of each of the subjects in their lives and… read more

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F For Fake: An Editing Masterpiece

March 25, 2011 by Samantha Sterman on Samantha Sterman's Blog · Uncategorized

I think I found some new friends in Marie-Sophie Dubus and Dominique Engerer, otherwise known as the editors of Orson Welles’ F For Fake. The style of editing seemed to oddly mimic my own stream of consciousness. The camera wanders and flips back and forth between complementary images, repeating the… read more

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M

March 16, 2011 by Michael Stanton on Michael Stanton's Blog · Uncategorized

My favorite – though perhaps favorite is not the right word – was Eslie’s disappearance. Particularly, when there was a series of shots – Elsie’s empty place at the table, the balloon hanging from the telephone wire etc. I don’t recall any music or sound during this part which I… read more

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M

March 13, 2011 by Nikki on Nikki Heyman's Blog · Uncategorized

M was Fritz Lang’s first sound film. He used sound in such a away that almost alienated the actor’s’ voices from their bodies, as there was so little diegetic sound that when an actor did speak it came across as if they were in a vacuum. There… read more

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Irma Vep (Oliver Assayas, 1996)

March 13, 2011 by Arielle Edelman on Arielle Edelman's Blog · Uncategorized

My favorite scene from Oliver Assayas’ film Irma Vep, which was screened last Sunday was the one in which Maggie returned to her hotel room after witnessing Rene’s meltdown. Set to the song “Tunic” by Sonic Youth, the camera was incredibly frenetic, panning quickly around the room from the window… read more

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