Emma Hosford's Blog

An Oberlin course blog

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Art project

May 20th, 2011 by Emma Hosford · Uncategorized

In my sculpture class we looked at this art project that took all the frames of The Godfather and put them all onto one page. The nature of film is transient because we can’t see all of it at once. It is interesting to think about the difference that could make — if film was made more concrete. What if we could take one snapshot of a movie, one moment, and understand the full scope of it. Somehow I think the magic would be lost.

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Difference between trailers and films

May 20th, 2011 by Emma Hosford · Uncategorized

For the Dvd commentary project, my group did Shutter Island. One of the most interesting things i encountered in my research was the huge difference between the feeling of the trailer and the film itself. The trailer is marketed it as more of a horror film, but really, there are very few aspects of the horror genera in the film. It can sometimes seem as if trailers are, in and of themselves, mini movies. It is interesting to think about the goals of these mini films. They are there as marketing tools, but sometimes don’t remain true at all the the film even though they are made of its parts.

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Steven Soderbergh

April 29th, 2011 by Emma Hosford · Uncategorized

I find it interesting to think about Steven Soderbergh’s other works in relation to Sex Lies and Videotape. Most interestingly, The Oceans movies, and a low budget film called the Girlfriend Experience, chronicling the life of a prostitute. Sex Lies and Videotape and The Girlfriend Experience can easily be called similar, but while one deals with very deep and disturbing emotions with a sort of intentional blandness, the other is slick and sexy. They both deal with issues of sexuality, but the way sex is viewed is almost opposite. The Oceans movies have both some of the grit of Sex Lies and Videotape and the sleek qualities of the Girlfriend Experience. Erin Brockovich is also an interesting contribution to his directing career. All of these movies have a sort of sexiness about them, and interestingly enough, Sex Lies and Videotape, the film that most directly looks at sex, is the least sexy.

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When hipster were really hip.

March 8th, 2011 by Emma Hosford · Uncategorized

Shadow’s hipsters were so hip. At a school where everyone seems to be at least a semi-hipster, I still managed to be engaged and drawn in by the oh-so-cool act of the 1950’s hipster. Of course, they were rude and mean, but that was all part of the charm; I liked them for this. I began to wonder why I was so attracted to this scene? And I realized: nostalgia has everything to do with it. Rebelling somehow seemed new then. Today, some rebels seem like they are fitting into another social norm, another category of young, restless people. Of course there have always been rebels. The rebels of the 1950’s were just the beginning of what would ironically become a widely normative thing. Even half a century later, Shadows feels new and fresh. This is so refreshing (pardon the pun), when in present day what is hip can feel weighted down by years and years of tradition of what rebelling is, and the culturization of this rebelling. Films love to look at the rebel, and of course they do; rebels are fascinating and interesting. However, this has made the act of rebelling today less interesting. Hipsters have to work harder to be hip. (i.e.: lookatthisfuckinghipster.com – a scary and strange place)
Don’t get me wrong, I love hipster, but sometimes I wish being “hip” were as effortless looking as how it looks in Shadows.

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Frenchness Taking Over!

March 8th, 2011 by Emma Hosford · Uncategorized

I was rather baffled by the ending of Irma Vep; I found it fascinating, but baffling nonetheless. It felt like it was paying some sort of homage to the new wave. While the new wave didn’t have a lot of weird scratches and blots deliberately placed on the screen, there was the desire to make the audience wonder about style and tradition. While this movie is French, it is oddly and interestingly linked to Hong Kong’s cinematic tradition, mostly though the star of the film. She is the one tie, and at times this tie seems tenuous at best, at others this tie takes over the films aesthetic. The scene in which Maggie steals the necklace from the naked woman seems far more in the vein of Hong-Kong cinema than that of the French. Part of this may have had to do with the blue tint, which just doesn’t feel French. Feeling “French” is an interesting thing. It is not something that we, as viewers can really put our finger on. Aesthetics are tricky things, they are difficult to really understand or describe with much accuracy (for they are not about accuracy, they are about the “feeling” of it).
Anyway, to get back to my point about Irma Vep, it seemed as if the director wanted the ending to feel like the “frenchness” was taking over, just as the French actress was about to take over Maggie’s role. The black blots on the screen were essentially erasing her. With the blots over her face, she could be anyone; she could even be French.

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