Zack Knoll

Zack Knoll

Zack Knoll

A Sufi poem by Mansür al-Hallaj struck me as particularly representative of several Islamic theological and artistic themes. The poem reads: He am I whom I love, He whom I love is I, Two Spirits in one single body dwelling. So seest thou me, then seest thou Him, And seest thou Him, then seest thou Us.(…)

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Zack Knoll

Zack Knoll

Visiting the Cleveland mosque was a fantastic opportunity to see how theoretical concepts we’ve discussed in class are actualized. Particularly, it was nice to experience the lightness of the mosque—both physically and psychically. It is a calm space with wonderful acoustics, most notably exemplified through Professor Mahallati’s chanting. The way his voice carried through the entire building with such(…)

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Zack Knoll

Zack Knoll

The religion department art display is visually stunning and drew me in simply through its vibrancy of color and pattern—which seems to be a standard in much Islamic art. I was very interested in the way that the Arabic text is transformed from language into intricate patterns and images via calligraphy. This was most apparent to me in(…)

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Zack Knoll

Zack Knoll

Verses on page 16 of the prayer book highlight the importance of monotheism in the Islamic faith as well as the concept that God is evoked in all aspects of life. The verses that read: “There is no god but You! / We beg for mercy, protect us from Hell! / O the only Lord(…)

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Zack Knoll

Zack Knoll

The 31st chapter of the Quran, Luqman highlights several overarching moral and ethical beliefs in the Islamic faith. The key trend throughout most of the versus in Luqman is that Allah rewards his followers for doing good and wishes for them to avoid doing wrong deeds; however, within the text, the terms “good” (or “right”)(…)

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