Emily Clarke

Emily Clarke

Emily Clarke

Hafez’s “Suffer Not Grief” and Islamic Theology of Death In the poem “Suffer Not Grief,” Hafez reminds the reader (as well as himself, in the last verse!) that death is predetermined by Allah; that the mundane is not the only reality and afterlife is eternal and blissful; and that faith can provide a way out of mourning.(…)

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Emily Clarke

Emily Clarke

The art in the display case is both beautiful and functional; objects like the ceramic plate in the Mina art form of Iran contain 99 names of Allah, all radiating outwards from text in the center, in recognition, thanks, perhaps prayer. An object as mundane as a plate thus becomes ornate through calligraphy, mirroring in its spread the(…)

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Emily Clarke

Emily Clarke

In verse 41 of “Prayer for All,” an important facet of Islamic cosmology and one of the three principles of faith is described and interpreted. Muaad, the name for this principle, means a belief in the Day of Judgment; in the existence of the Hereafter, heaven and hell, as well as the Unseen, which holds(…)

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