Sufism

Environmentalism in the Quran and the Bible

Environmentalism in the Quran and the Bible

“What people do about their ecology depends on what they think about themselves in relation to things around them. Human ecology is deeply conditioned by beliefs about our nature and destiny — that is, by religion” [1].   Religion inherently deals with a variety of ‘fields’, such as culture, theology, science and philosophy and through(…)

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Jorge Kalil: Alike in Origin and Expression

Jorge Kalil: Alike in Origin and Expression

The 16th century was a flourishing period for the European continent; Portuguese explorers had rounded the tip of Africa, Francisco Pizarro had conquered the Incan empire, and Europe was well into its cultural renaissance. Things were no different for the Muslim world to the East, which experienced the rise of three great empires that thrived(…)

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Christian Bolles: Humble Revelation: Dualism and Unity in the Islamic Worldview

Christian Bolles: Humble Revelation: Dualism and Unity in the Islamic Worldview

A thousand-year-old religion boasting a wild heterogeneity of traditions, ethics, and worldviews, Islam unites a divergent but connected network of sub-religions that draw different conclusions from the same text. These differences stem mainly from multivarious approaches to the Quran itself, and speak to the fundamental ethics of each denomination. For the purposes of this response,(…)

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Hayley Segall: Moral Codes and Paradigms of Islam

Hayley Segall: Moral Codes and Paradigms of Islam

Islam has a highly codified moral and legal system in which behaviors and expectations of Muslim followers are founded in sacred works such as the Quran, the Hadith, pre-Islamic traditions, and reason[1].  There are many ways to describe Islamic ethics and paradigms, but the more effective way is to explore how the structures of Islamic(…)

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Weaving Theologies

Weaving Theologies The Web of the Primary Tenets of Islam by Zoë Kushlefsky   The religion of Islam is one with a beautiful and dynamic history. One can learn about the worldviews and paradigms of practicing Muslims, but it is a different thing entirely to be an actual participant in the devotional rituals of the(…)

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Owen Ellerkamp: Growing Divide Between Peacemaking and Violence

Owen Ellerkamp: Growing Divide Between Peacemaking and Violence

In Thomas Merton’s book Passion for Peace: Reflections on War and Nonviolence he writes passionately on the cause for peace on earth successfully shying away from any idealistic vision of harmony, but instead recognizing the fraught nature of politics. In his first chapter “The Root of War is Fear” he speaks about the human construction(…)

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Delaney Meyers: Akbar the Great: Pluralism, Stability, Power

Delaney Meyers: Akbar the Great: Pluralism, Stability, Power

Diana Eck—Harvard Professor, interfaith advocate, and creator of The Pluralism Project— defines pluralism as “not diversity alone, but the energetic engagement with diversity”. She says pluralism goes beyond passive tolerance, requiring “the active seeking of understanding across lines of difference” (What is Pluralism?). Akbar ruled over an emperor with immense diversity, and he embodied tolerance(…)

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Britta Janssen: “The Lordly Wind:” Eco-Spirituality in the Poetry of Jalāl Al-Dīn Rūmī

Britta Janssen: “The Lordly Wind:” Eco-Spirituality in the Poetry of Jalāl Al-Dīn Rūmī

“The Lordly Wind:” Eco-Spirituality in the Poetry of Jalāl Al-Dīn Rūmī The role of nature in the religion of Islam can be observed in multiple ways. Those interested in the human nature relationship can look at the way governments and religious leaders talk about the environment, or alternatively, the opposing views of dissenting non-profits and(…)

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Rebecca Posner: The Ethical Roles of Sharia and Sufism in the Islamic World

Rebecca Posner: The Ethical Roles of Sharia and Sufism in the Islamic World

Islam is a highly complex religion, with a long history that goes back for many centuries.  As a result, the Islamic worldview cannot be easily reduced down to a few simple concepts.  However, there are certain basic duties that every practicing Muslim is expected to adhere to.  These are known as the Five Pillars of(…)

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Reactions by the Alem-i Mümin

Reactions by the Alem-i Mümin

 Reactions from the Alem-i Mümin   Our readings and class discussion in the last weeks revolved around intrareligious interactions, especially involving the Muslim community’s responses to outside stimuli. And especially our fierce brainstorming in class when we personnally experienced overlapping master narratives revealed to me how significantly single stories can dominate/disrupt knowledge.  Our attempts to(…)

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Rubin, Perry Final Paper: Navigating the intersection of the corporeal and spiritual in Sufism

Rubin, Perry Final Paper: Navigating the intersection of the corporeal and spiritual in Sufism

  I believe it is fair to say all religions are, in some way, preoccupied with the intersection of corporeality and spirituality. Faiths, internationally, often times disavow the body and its various functions as confining and inherently at odds with the quest for enlightenment, which is seen as non-temporal. Sufism proposes a model of thinking(…)

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James Fleming (RELG 373): The Eternal and the Ephemeral, Differences in Mystical Approaches

James Fleming (RELG 373): The Eternal and the Ephemeral, Differences in Mystical Approaches

Though all are considered to be vital to nearly all tariqas, or Sufi lines, the poets and mystics Rumi, Hafez, and Sa’di differ in their views on how the mystic concepts behind Sufism should be approached. This can be demonstrated with examples of their works, which for these purposes include, A son leaves his father(…)

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James Fleming (RELG 373): Can We Have Intoxication in the Holy Space?

James Fleming (RELG 373): Can We Have Intoxication in the Holy Space?

  In Islam there is a complex relationship between spirituality, architectural form, and performative prayer. The latter two may seem to be exoteric aspects of the religion, however, as demonstrated in Sufi poetry there are significant mystical aspects to the architecture of mosques and other Islamic structures, as well as relating to aspects such as(…)

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Mohit Dubey: Of Mosques and Mysticism

Mohit Dubey: Of Mosques and Mysticism

In the Islamic tradition, architectural form and the performative dimension of prayer are symbolically woven into spirituality. This interconnectedness has its roots in the story of the Prophet himself, who built the first mosque (Mosque Kuba) in Medina after staying there for six months as a guest of Ali. In the exegesis titled Zaad al-Ma’aad, Ibn(…)

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Noah Schiller: Three Rumi Poems

Noah Schiller: Three Rumi Poems

The first poem I have selected to analyze is The Qazvin Softie Who Wanted a Tattoo. I found this poem both humorous and insightful. The poem is about a man from a town called Qazvin who asks his barber to tattoo a lion across his shoulder blades. However, whenever the barber begins his work, the(…)

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James Fleming (RELG 373): Rumi and the Paradox of the Moment’s Son

James Fleming (RELG 373): Rumi and the Paradox of the Moment’s Son

Although Rumi’s verse in his work Masnavi is laid out in a very clear manner with simple allegorical structure, the content and the underlying meaning is far from being being restricted to any such manner of superficiality. Each poem is extremely multilayered, with many esoteric truths and mystic knowledge being alluded to. As a result(…)

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