Art

Adam Jussila: The Ideas of the Infinite and Unity in Islamic Art

Adam Jussila: The Ideas of the Infinite and Unity in Islamic Art

  Islamic art was born from the Muslim people’s very first work of art, the Qur’an. It serves as the chief inspiration and motivation for Muslim artists. There are many lines of their holy text that invite people to create art in the name of Allah. One such line says that the only divinely approved(…)

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Anna Moore: Islamic Art – Connecting and Cleansing

Anna Moore: Islamic Art – Connecting and Cleansing

We learned in class that Iranian film walks on the border between theocracy and liberalism.[1] I don’t know enough to say whether on the border, it is both theocratic and liberal or neither theocratic nor liberal. In other words, I don’t know if the border connects or divides. Yet in reading about other Islamic art(…)

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Haley Jones: Islamic Art at the AMAM

Haley Jones: Islamic Art at the AMAM

The small but diverse collection of Islamic art at the Allen Memorial Art museum is an excellent sample of the core principles governing this genre. Spanning from the late 7th century to the 20th century, as well as from Egypt to India, the collection represents a great variety of objects as well. Weapons, silverware, glassware,(…)

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Federico Consuegra : Features of Islamic Art

Federico Consuegra : Features of Islamic Art

Features of Islamic Art Islamic Art refers to the 1400 years of art created by Islamic cultures. Islamic Art is  varied, traditional, recognizable and serves to illustrate great literary works, function as utilitarian objects, and praise God.1  Islamic Art is not necessarily religious. It includes all the art created by Islamic societies and often includes(…)

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Sarah J. Williams: The Omnipresence of the Divine in Islamic Art

Sarah J. Williams: The Omnipresence of the Divine in Islamic Art

Islamic art, insofar as it can be defined, is defined by the presence of a religious intention in the product created by the artist. With this definition, it might seem redundant to say that the presence of the divine is another signifier of the body of Islamic art, and, while not inaccurate, such a statement(…)

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Rebecca Posner: Cultural Commonalities in the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal Empires

Rebecca Posner: Cultural Commonalities in the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal Empires

Three major empires came into being in the Middle East and India and reached the height of their power during the sixteenth century.  These were the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal empires.  Although they differed in many ways, they had several important aspects in common.  All three of these dynasties were founded and maintained by Muslim(…)

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Adam Jussila: A Common Heritage: Mughal, Ottoman, and Safavid Empires

Adam Jussila: A Common Heritage: Mughal, Ottoman, and Safavid Empires

Three empires rose out of the Islamic societies in the Middle East and Central Asia, all coming into existence around the end of the 15th century into the beginning of the 16th century. They were the Ottoman Empire in the west, the Safavid Empire mostly in Iran, and the Mughal Empire in the east, covering(…)

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Intersections Between Medieval Islamic Empires – Ciaran Disny

Intersections Between Medieval Islamic Empires – Ciaran Disny

Response Paper 4 Three Islamic empires dominated Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe, and of course, the Middle East. The rise of these empires all occurred during the middle ages, or the medieval age. These empires were known as the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal empires. Many different factors set these empires apart including the lands that they(…)

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Leo Hochberg: Diversity and Art in the Three Medieval Muslim Empires

Leo Hochberg: Diversity and Art in the Three Medieval Muslim Empires

Even the greatest of historians could not successfully document all the many commonalities between the three medieval Muslim empires. However, two stand out in their descriptions of imperial culture, the first being responses to internal diversity. Each empire met its own struggle to maintain central authority throughout its expansion without risking the alienation of its(…)

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Max Condon: Islamic Thought and European Development

Max Condon: Islamic Thought and European Development

During the Islamic Golden Age, the cultivation of knowledge led to centuries of advancements across a variety of fields.  Mathematics, astronomy, medicine, physics, and philosophy all flourished as great thinkers and resources came together in centers for intellectual discovery.  Islamic civilization became a bastion for the great academic texts of history, defending, translating, and building(…)

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Camille Backman: Engaging Community in Art

Camille Backman: Engaging Community in Art

  Language, community, and art largely influenced pre-modern societal Muslim Interfaith relations. Further, a large trend of translation and cross-cultural pollination provide support to positive and understanding alternative narratives of pre-modern interfaith relations. Respect out of similarity defined the initial relationship between Judaism and Islam, particularly before the spread of colonialism. Due to the gradual(…)

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Rebecca Posner: The Influence of Islamic Culture on the Renaissance

Rebecca Posner: The Influence of Islamic Culture on the Renaissance

During the Middle Ages and beginning in the ninth century, literature, science, and the arts all experienced a major resurgence within the Islamic world.[i]  This was due to the influence both of government policies and of individual scholars who were interested in intellectual progress.  In addition to coming up with new ideas and creations in(…)

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Georgia Lederman: Third Party Investment and Local Empowerment: Attempts at Equilibrium

Georgia Lederman: Third Party Investment and Local Empowerment: Attempts at Equilibrium

We have just received one million dollar. We have decided to create a peacemaking institution called Peace+ (pronounced peace-plus). Peace+ will address the many different domains in which peacemaking is necessary, including, “ecological, personal, institutional, political and social domains” (In class 4/26). As Peace+ budgets its one million dollars, we will follow this guiding principle:(…)

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Georgia Lederman: The union of beauty and sorrow: The use of music in peacemaking

Georgia Lederman: The union of beauty and sorrow: The use of music in peacemaking

  The union of beauty and sorrow In a search of hope for tomorrow Peace in a musical sigh Asking and answering, why? –Georgia Lederman   Though policies and laws are critical in the development of just, sustainable peace, mechanisms that stimulate nonintellectual understanding are essential in shifting the global paradigm. According to Amanda Brown,(…)

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Alan Carroll: This is My Song

Alan Carroll: This is My Song

In 1899 , the great Finnish composer, Jean Sibelius, wrote a symphonic tone poem, “Finlandia.” The second half of this tone poem was a choral hymn, which was a celebration of Finnish patriotism, because Finland had just nearly freed herself from oppressive rule by their large neighbor, Russia. A YouTube video that includes beautiful images(…)

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Erica Levin: Marc Chagall’s Works of Peace

I do not think I know one Jew that was not affected by the Holocaust. As a Jew, you are raised knowing a piece of yourself is missing, that it was lost years ago, taken from you. As a Jew, you are expected to come to terms with a part of your family being murdered,(…)

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