About

Posts by :

Catherine Lytle: Chagall — my one and only

    What is friendship? Friendship is two people sitting on a bench looking at the same sunset and one friend points out something to the other friend saying “look at that. Isn’t that marvelous?” When I first moved to Oberlin I stumbled upon this painting and I immediately felt safe and warm. I imagined(…)

Continue reading

Catherine Lytle: proposal for an institutionalized friendship

Catherine Lytle: proposal for an institutionalized friendship

The Lípa Foundation: Institutionalization of Friendship For this week’s response paper I wanted to attempt to design my own response to institutionalizing friendship. In class we talked a lot about NGOs being solutions to national and domestic institutionalizations of friendships and therefore I wanted to create one which addresses identity, political oppression and forgiveness. My(…)

Continue reading

Catherine Lytle: how to lose a friend in 10 days

Catherine Lytle: how to lose a friend in 10 days

What is a near-global sport these days?  Shopping. But not just any kind of shopping. It’s the therapy kind of consumerism that is the most prevalent. Some people say that they don’t shop but they are do consume because it is impossible not to these days. Some people eat and spend their money on sweet(…)

Continue reading

Catherine Lytle: The Return of Friendship

Catherine Lytle: The Return of Friendship

The Return of Friendship. That sounds like a good movie title that would probably attract millions in box office revenue. But what does that mean? “The Return of Friendship” Has it ever gone anywhere? Was there a time where there was no friendship? It is true that if we quantify how much philosophers since Aristotle(…)

Continue reading

Catherine Lytle: Whose sandal is it really? Asks Al-Ghazali

Catherine Lytle: Whose sandal is it really? Asks Al-Ghazali

There is a fascinating bridge between West and East. If we get past the socially constructed definition of “East” and “West” what are we left with? What about all those countries in the middle? What do we call them? Today everybody is always set on being unique and being different because somehow that will propel(…)

Continue reading

Catherine Lytle: But the classics are dead anyway

Catherine Lytle: But the classics are dead anyway

I live with the belief that there is no concept in contemporary society that would not also be evident in Ancient civilizations in some shape or another. Selfishness and egocentricity may seem hyperbolized in today’s age, however, that does not insinuate that such issues arose solely in our Post-Modern society. Rather such weaknesses become highlighted(…)

Continue reading

Catherine Lytle: From Gerbils to Trolleybus

Catherine Lytle: From Gerbils to Trolleybus

Introduction There are stories in my family about two Mongolian gerbils that my uncle owned in the late 1970s. Their names were Babrak and Karmal. I’ve wondered over time how could a 10-year-old boy living in a flat on the 11th floor of a Socialist concrete building in then-Czechoslovakia could know the name of a(…)

Continue reading

Catherine Lytle: Something about us doesn’t seem right these days

Catherine Lytle: Something about us doesn’t seem right these days

When considering the Palestinian-Israeli problem we are faced with the notion of political master narratives. Historians and politicians are eager to create a narrative that they then make universal and people are forced to comply. However, this spawns more problems than solves because, firstly, I believe that few things are truly ‘universal’ and therefore differences(…)

Continue reading

Catherine Lytle: Differences are easy to find. Its the similarities that everyone forgets

Catherine Lytle: Differences are easy to find. Its the similarities that everyone forgets

When considering the difference between East Asian and West Asian Muslim states the preordained notion that the majority of non-Muslims is that a Muslim is a Muslim is a Muslim is a Muslim. There are 1.6 billion muslims in the world so naturally they must all have the same beliefs about Islam and live the(…)

Continue reading

Catherine Lytle: A dialogue about the Shia-Wahhabi encounter

Catherine Lytle: A dialogue about the Shia-Wahhabi encounter

When considering a relationship between countries it is important to understand what the citizens espouse themselves with the most, be it religion, culture, language or ethnicity. It is increasingly less possible to dictate decisions based on Western binarisms and artificially drawn borders and personally I find my identity to often be misunderstood and incorrectly interpreted(…)

Continue reading

Catherine Lytle: A new type of reformation

Catherine Lytle: A new type of reformation

When there is an alteration in an individual’s environment, be it political or sociological, then there is a potential for change. While this change can be considered as ‘progress’ it will not necessarily be positive progress. Everything begins with the self; we are all unique. The geist in the Hegelian sense is the constant improvement(…)

Continue reading

Catherine Lytle: Which way are you looking: upstream or downstream?

Catherine Lytle: Which way are you looking: upstream or downstream?

Heraclitus said that, “You cannot step into the same river twice.” Richard Bulliet questions the direction that the person is looking when they step into the river: upstream or downstream? According to Bulliet, “Historians are looking downstream…Policy makers and political scientists, by contrast, look upstream.”1 If I stepped into that river I would wonder what(…)

Continue reading

Catherine Lytle: The influence of religion and politics on early Muslim political philosophy

Catherine Lytle: The influence of religion and politics on early Muslim political philosophy

The word ‘Muslim’ is not an adjective: it is an action. It pertains to someone who submitted themselves to the laws of God. There are two kinds relationships: first and foremost a personal relationship with God and secondly personal relationships with other humans. Muslim self-image gave preeminent importance to the ideals of unity and community(…)

Continue reading

css.php